1. Machias patriots unite!

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  2. Machias physics class wins at engineering, sportsmanship

     

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Usually it’s a good thing to move up the rankings in a competition, but sometimes moving down has its merits, too. Machias Memorial High School’s Honors Physics class recently won third place in the Kleinschmidt Windstorm Challenge, an impressive placing in a statewide engineering contest. But the story of how they gave up second place may be even more impressive.

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  3. MBACC award dinner celebrates strength and community spirit

     

    by Reagan Gilbert

    The Machias Bay Area Chamber of Commerce (MBACC) Annual Dinner, Awards and Auction was held at the Kilburn Commons building at the University of Maine at Machias on Friday, May 25. 

    The evening began with drinks and conversation among neighbors, all coming out to support the MBACC in its efforts to raise money for future endeavors. Musician Duane Ingalls performed during the social hour as people arrived, perused the auction items and waited for the awards to be given out.  

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  4. Community rallies after fire

     

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Almost 400 people attended a benefit supper and Chinese auction to benefit Melissa Hinerman and JJ Tibbetts who lost their home to fire on Sunday, June 2. The Machiasport home was built by Hinerman’s own great grandparents and had been home to four generations of her family.

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  5. Restoring a steeple—starting with the clock

     

    by Nancy Beal

    Three members of Jonesport’s Sawyer Memorial Congregational Church came to Jonesport selectmen June 6 to press their case for the clock they hope one day to put back in a new steeple atop their church. Last fall, the 100-year-old steeple was brought down by workers in cranes dismantling it board by rotten board. Down too came the brass bell that had once tolled the hour and the clock that told it when to ring.

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  6. Local students share ‘What the Flag Means to Me’

    On Thursday, June 14 we will observe Flag Day. For over 69 years the Hannah Weston Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution has sponsored the Flag Essay Contest, asking students in local elementary schools to write a few words on “What the Flag Means to Me.” Over the years the words and concerns of the young people have changed, reflecting for the most part the current events of the times, but in all these years, one theme has come through - love of this wonderful country and its flag.

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  7. ‘We need to have our voice heard’

    by Ruth Leubecker

    As a two-term Calais mayor and longtime civic leader, Marianne Moore has always had her voice heard. It’s just that this time around she’s competing in a larger arena.

    “I had run for the House two years ago and came in second,” she says. “When Joyce decided not to run I thought, why not? We need to have our voice heard.”

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  8. Maine losing ground, approaching crisis on vital priority

    Children. They can be the bane of our existence, the object of much affection — or not. But they are indeed the shining promise of the future.

    However, Maine by all measurable accounts, comes up woefully short when it comes to nurturing and growing this most valuable resource. Yes, we say all the right words, the rhetoric regularly pours forth, and Maine has started a multitude of organizations all aimed toward children and their welfare. But actions speak louder than words, and we haven’t had many of those.

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  9. Holmes tells of Margaretta Days, past and present

     

    by  Reagan Gilbert

    Carlene Holmes presented a slideshow of past and upcoming Margaretta Days festivities to a recent meeting of the Machias Rotary Club. Holmes chairs the annual June event for the Machias Historical Society.

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  10. Top MMHS students offer humorous advice, inspiration

    Editor’s note: On Sunday, June 3, Machias Memorial High School’s Class of 2018 received their diplomas. Farrow McKenna spoke as class valedictorian, and Meagan Jordan spoke as salutatorian. Below are excerpts from the speeches they delivered to the assembly.

     MMHS Valedictorian Farrow McKenna

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  11. Art, poetry, music at Jonesport’s Peabody Memorial Library

    by Nancy Beal

    The summer array of the arts began last weekend at Jonesport’s Peabody Memorial Library, with an artists’ reception and the beginning of a month-long silent auction of whimsical birdhouses fashioned by area students.

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  12. No barriers for Noah Carver

     

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    He has his own radio show, he’s a successful activist, and he enjoys skiing every chance he gets. He rides horseback, enjoys the music of Broadway and this month he’ll hop on a plane to sing soprano solos with his chorus in France — for the second time. But first, Noah Carver will complete a two-week expedition in Nepal.

    Noah Carver is 14 years old.

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  13. Benefit planned after loss of Machiasport family home

     

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Four generations of Hinermans have lived in the Machiasport home Melissa Hinerman shared with her partner, JJ Tibbetts, but fire destroyed the white-clapboard home on the night of Saturday, June 2. The Machiasport Fire Department responded to the call with Machias, Roque Bluffs, East Machias, Jonesboro and Marshfield departments rendering mutual aid. Machias Fire Chief Joey Dennison served as incident commander. The home was built by Hinerman’s great grandparents.

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  14. Machias town report shows minimal municipal spending increase

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Voters attending next week’s annual town meeting in Machias will find a $4,000 increase in the town’s proposed 2018-19 budget. 

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  15. TiP tackles tough issues facing the elderly, disabled

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Home repairs, respite for caregivers and initiating an occupational technical program for students were some of the topics discussed at the latest Thriving in Place meeting.

    “The gist of it is there are a lot of ideas on the table,” said Christine Laurel, CCC training coordinator. “A lot of people were sitting around this table who are in this category: they make too much money to qualify for help, but not enough to pay to get the work done.”

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  16. Ice Hill South Resolved?

    by Nancy Beal

    The four residents of Jonesport’s Ice Hill South who have been feuding — at times, bitterly — about property lines and use of each other’s property by visitors, came to the Jonesport selectmen’s May 30 meeting with news of a reconciliation. Selectman Billy Milliken said he had been talking with the four — Anthony Casino, Brian Lawrence, Ray Jones and David Wardwell — earlier that afternoon and the outcome had been agreements all around.

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  17. At the Machias ballot box - Meet candidate Joshua Rolfe

     

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Editor’s note: This is the fourth in our series introducing voters to the four candidates running for two seats on the Machias Selectboard. The town will vote on Tuesday, June 12. 

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  18. Inventing the doughnut hole: it happened in Maine

    By now everyone has heard about Chester Greenwood and his earmuffs. And the caterpillar tread, and the zig-zag stitch. All enduring Maine inventions. But how about the doughnut hole?

    Hanson Crockett Gregory, so the story goes, was only 16 when, to make the doughnut more palatable and less doughy, he invented the hole in the doughnut. History has it that in a storm-tossed sea on a fishing boat Gregory needed both hands to steer so he shoved his doughnut onto a wheel spoke. This was the beginning.

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  19. 2nd CD candidate Jared Golden returns to Washington County

    by Nancy Beal

    Jared Golden, a state legislator who is hoping to prevail in next week’s primary among Democrats vying to challenge (Republican) 2nd  Congressional District Rep. Bruce Poliquin next November, made a second appearance in Washington County May 27 at a town hall gathering at the University of Maine at Machias. He previously spoke to the county Democratic committee last February.

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  20. Letter for the Editor - Russell will serve Washington County as governor

    Russell will serve Washington County as governor

    Here in Washington County, it is easy to see the thing Maine needs most: Jobs. What I am not seeing is a lot of action to make that happen, despite the supposedly business-friendly policies of the LePage administration.

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  21. Letter for the Editor - Reisman supports Mason

    Reisman supports Mason

    Three reasons to support Garrett Mason for Governor

    He’ll be an education governor, backing school choice, affordable higher education and workforce training.

    He’ll be a freedom governor, backing first amendment guarantees of free speech and religious liberty.

    He’ll be a unifying “one Maine” governor, opposing progressive interest groups who have abused the referendum process to promote class warfare and identity politics.

    Jon Reisman

    Cooper

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  22. Letter for the Editor - Support Ranked Choice Voting

    Support Ranked Choice Voting

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  23. Ballads of Newfoundland to be shared at Calais Celtic Concert

     

    by  Lura Jackson

    As part of the award-winning Calais Celtic Concert Series, acclaimed solo singer Matthew Byrne of Newfoundland will be bringing his world-class act to Calais on Wednesday, June 13. Byrne, who comes from a family embedded in traditional music, has performed in locations all around the globe.

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  24. Washington Academy’s Class of 2018

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  25. Calais senior accepted to Air Force Academy

     

    by  Lura Jackson

    One of the most selective military programs in the country – the United States Air Force Academy – is about to receive a graduate from Calais Middle High School [CMHS]. Haley “Boosta” Donovan will be among the cadets at the elite academy when classes start at the end of June. After four years, if she is among the approximately 1,000 students that successfully graduate each year, she will be awarded with a Bachelor of Science and an officer position in the Air Force.

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  26. Jonesport - Beals High School announces Class of 2018 Honor Parts

    The class of 2018 valedictorian is Ivy Robinson, daughter of Patricia and Michael Robinson of Addison. Ivy is a member of the National Honor Society receiving many academic accolades. She has displayed many leadership qualities at J-BHS serving as the class president, and representing J-BHS at the Maine Youth Leadership Conference since 2016. She was also selected as the DAR Good Citizen Award candidate.

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  27. Jonesport - Beals High School announces Class of 2018 Honor Parts

    The class of 2018 valedictorian is Ivy Robinson, daughter of Patricia and Michael Robinson of Addison. Ivy is a member of the National Honor Society receiving many academic accolades. She has displayed many leadership qualities at J-BHS serving as the class president, and representing J-BHS at the Maine Youth Leadership Conference since 2016. She was also selected as the DAR Good Citizen Award candidate.

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  28. WA co-Valedictorians urge facing future with ‘hope and promise,’ offer thanks

     Editor’s note: On Monday, June 4 Washington Academy’s class of 2018 received their diplomas. This year WA had two valedictorians, and below are excerpts from the speeches they made at the ceremony. 

    Cameryn Farnsworth

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  29. Lottiemae Margaret (Durrett) Mattes - Cutler

    Lottiemae Margaret (Durrett) Mattes, 82, passed away May 8, 2018 at her home surrounded by her loving family. She was born July 11, 1935 in New Orleans, Louisiana, the daughter of the late Capt. Alfred William Durrett, Sr. and Dolores Mae (Schock) Durrett.

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  30. The deer numbers

    by V. Paul  Reynolds

    “Hey, Paul, you’ve got to be kidding me! It’s March and you guys still don’t have the tally on last fall’s deer kill?” asked the New England outdoor editor of a national sporting magazine. That scolding took place more than 20 years ago, when I was press officer for the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

    During my three-year tenure with IF&W, it never changed. Blame was placed on the deer tagging stations.

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  31. Maine Veterans’ salutes lost loved ones at annual remembrance ceremony

     

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Maine Veterans’ Homes (MVH) in Machias hosted its ninth Annual Remembrance Ceremony on Wednesday, May 23, this year in honor of U.S. Navy veterans Roland Cheney, Marjorie Morrison and David Phaneuf. All three passed away in the last year.

    The Presentation of the Colors was done by the American Legion Post #65 and bagpipes were played by the Anah Highlanders. 

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  32. Candidates race to preserve legacy, promote rural focus

    by Ruth Leubecker

    The race to the Blaine House, while gaining steam, remains multi-directional, offering few specifics and even fewer individual plans of any contender.

    The field so far is crowded, with Republicans appearing to be wary of deviating too far from Gov. Paul LePage’s actions on the issues. On some level there even appears an effort to preserve his legacy. By all accounts bombastic and controversial, Maine’s governor has nonetheless achieved results in lowering taxes and making things happen.

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  33. DEI guides Beals Elementary students in seeding clams on island flats

     

    by Nancy Beal

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  34. In service to veterans

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  35. At the Machias ballot box - Meet candidate Les Haynes

     

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Leslie Haynes has served on the Machias Selectboard for six years. “I just enjoy the people,” he said. Haynes was raised in East Machias and couldn’t wait to get back home after serving in the Army for a tour in Vietnam. “I had never ever seen anything like that in my life. In 1968 I was right in the middle of that big Tet Offensive over there,” he said.

    “When I came home I looked at my commanding officer and said, ‘You’ve got 12 hours to get my discharge papers ready. I’m going to Maine where it’s nice and peaceful.’”

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  36. News shorts

    Stevenson at court on charges of manslaughter, OUI

    Christopher Stevenson of Roque Bluffs was in Washington County District Court on Tuesday, May 22 for his dispositional conference. 

    Stevenson has been charged with five crimes: manslaughter, operating under the influence of drugs or alcohol resulting in death, domestic violence reckless conduct, endangering the welfare of a child and operating while license is suspended or revoked.

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  37. Letter for the Editor - More trash talk

    More trash talk

    The real difference between Mark Wright’s garbage business and the Pleasant River Solid Waste Disposal District (PRSWDD, a transfer station) is that Wright’s is private for his personal profit, while PRSWDD is public, owned by the six towns, and run openly for the benefit of those towns.

    Mark Wright wants to own the entire garbage business in the region, but when there’s a monopoly, guess what would happen to the cost of garbage disposal?

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  38. Lighthouses lure romantics to Maine

    Embedded in literature, folklore and history, Maine’s lighthouses are a lightning rod, baiting authors, summer folk and young and old alike, espe summer.

    Some still function as navigational beacons, some are totally inaccessible, a few are clustered and a few others stand like solitary sentries. But it all doesn’t matter in the scheme of things, because all 65 are shrouded in a rich mysterious heritage that is uniquely Maine.

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  39. Calais talk to explore a ‘more just relationship’ with Wabanaki peoples

    by Lura Jackson

    The importance of recognizing the past and present relationship between colonizing Christian powers and the Wabanaki people – and particularly the Passamaquoddy tribe – will be the focus of a special presentation at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church in Calais on Sunday, June 3. The talk will be delivered by John Dieffenbacher-Krall, Chair of the Episcopal Diocese of Maine Committee on Indian Relations. 

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  40. Lack of markets forces PRSWDD recycling to shut out plastic, mixed paper

     

    by Nancy Beal

    Two weeks ago at their May 14 meeting, the board of directors of the Pleasant River Solid Waste Disposal District voted to stop taking plastic, glass and mixed paper as part of their recycling program. The reason: there is no market for glass, the various types of plastic, or the office paper, cereal boxes and other types of printed material that made up the mixed paper category.

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  41. Daryl Eugene McCurdy Lubec

    Daryl Eugene McCurdy (Tim) passed away peacefully at his home on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 surrounded by his family, after a long battle with cancer.  He was born in Lubec on October 12, 1941, son of the late Bernard and Muriel McCurdy. Daryl graduated from Lubec High School in 1961. Throughout the years he worked at Carlton Corey’s garage, Milliken Textile Mill, was owner and operator of “The Spruce” fishing vessel, and most recently worked and retired from the United States Department of Agriculture.

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  42. Margaretta Days celebrates revolutionary history Downeast

     

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Festival chair Carlene Holmes said she is often asked why the mid-June event is called Margaretta Days when it only occupies one day? 

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  43. Blackfly Ball moves to new October date

     

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Kehben Grier of Machias’ Beehive Design Collective announced last week that the Blackfly Ball will move from its traditional Blueberry Festival August time frame to October 6. The Blackfly Ball has become a fixture of summer in Machias, historically taking place on the Saturday night of the Machias Wild Blueberry Festival and drawing large crowds to Bad Little Falls park to hear multiple bands for free.

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  44. Four WCCC students named to All-Maine Academic Team

    The All-Maine Academic Team is composed of the high achieving students in the Maine Community College System, with selections picked from each school. Unlike in previous years, when only two students from each school were named, the team has been expanded this year to include students that are in both the “transfer” pathway – meaning they are planning to continue in their academic careers – and in the “career” pathway – meaning they will be going directly into the workforce upon graduation. Every student named to the team received a $500 scholarship.

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  45. Bay Ridge students map Maine’s flora and fauna

     

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